Ruby Speaks Out on Neutering Pets

Ruby Mixed Breed Dog Talks About NeuteringHi everybody!!!  I’m Ruby, a mixed breed dog, and my person is Dr. Katie.  Isn’t it a great day today!? I played outside, I ate breakfast, and then I settled down on my comfy couch to write a blog entry.

My life wasn’t always so easy.  You see, I had a hard life before Dr. Katie and her husband found me.   Way back in 2009, I found myself in quite the predicament; I was alone in the woods with 3 puppies to take care of.  My fur was dull and missing in patches.  All of us were covered in fleas and ticks, and we all had intestinal parasites.  One of my poor puppies even had a broken leg.  Unfortunately, my previous owners didn’t want me once I got pregnant – so they left me and my puppies in a forest for us to fend for ourselves.

Dr. Katie found us out there and gathered us up.  I hopped right in her car when she stopped, but she had to chase one my puppies for a half an hour before she caught him!  My puppy with the broken leg didn’t make it through the surgery to fix his leg, but the other two puppies found great homes!  Dr. Katie was going to find a new home for me, but nobody wanted me with my dull coat and saggy breasts.  Lucky for me, Dr. Katie and her husband decided to keep me, and I’ve spent every day since then making sure they know how much I love them.

One of Ruby's PuppiesThey got me spayed so I’ll never have to worry about unwanted puppies again.

You see there are just so many dogs out there; puppies can be really hard to find homes for.  Not all puppies are as lucky as my 2 that found homes.  It is estimated that 3.7 million unwanted animals were euthanized in shelters in 2008.

Wouldn’t it be great if we could spay and neuter our pets and not add to that number?  Another reason to spay and neuter your pets is that all those hormones produced by reproductive organs cause behavioral changes.  When I went into heat, I dripped blood all over my old owner’s house.  All the male dogs in the neighbor hood tried to escape to mate with me.  It was a mess!

Here are some more facts about neutering:

  • “Neutering” is a term that refers to the surgical removal of reproductive organs (of males and females).  Neutering a male is called castrating; for females it’s called spaying.
  • Neutering helps prevent certain types of cancer (like breast cancer or prostate cancer).
  • Neutering helps reduce urine marking and spraying.  You don’t want your male dog marking your walls do you?
  • Neutering helps keep animals safe.  Males that are desperately trying to get to a female are more likely to escape from their yard and get injured.
  • Neutering can help decrease “dominant” behaviors.
  • Neutering saves money in the long run.  For example…puppies and their mothers need booster, a lot of food, time and care.   If your dog has trouble with delivering, she may need a cesarean surgery –which can cost over $1500. I’m glad I didn’t need one, because I probably would have died out there all by myself!
  • Unspayed dogs can get a life threatening uterine infection called pyometra.  If this happens, she will most likely need expensive emergency surgery and she may die.

So if you have an unneutered pet, please call and schedule an appointment to have him or her “fixed.”